Air Pollution Control Newsroom 


Response to Public Comment on Proposed Near-Road Multi-Pollutant Monitoring Station

Friday April 26, 2013

Response to public comment on Proposed Near-Road Multi-Pollutant Monitoring Station

Comment:

I live in St Regis Park & my property is adjacent to the ramp from I264E to I64E. I would welcome an air pollution monitor here! The Upper Highlands Swim Club parking lot is next to my property & would also be good, although slightly less sooty. The presence of two curves on the ramp results in engine acceleration & braking - conditions provoking more emissions. There is a prolonged 3/4 mile uphill grade on I64E leading to overpass at I264, followed by shorter downhill grade; there is a shorter uphill &downhill grade at I64W overpass at I264. These grades, esp. I64E definitely add to engine stress and emissions, most noticeable with tractor trailers, dump trucks, etc. It is inherent in the design of a diesel engine that anytime there is a load shift (change in speed, change in grade & resultant engine stress) -then there will be increased diesel emissions. This should definitely be considered in placement of air quality monitor. Less congested areas, flatter terrain allows for vehicles to travel at more even speed & thus emissions should be less. Hurstbourne Ln/I64 may also be good site as it is "downwind" from I64/I264 interchange, + has a lot of traffic idling at traffic lights. Further east on I64, or on I265 should have less emissions as there is less traffic and less acceleration/braking. Thank-you for allowing public input on this issue.

- Barbara Woerner

Response:

As required, LMAPCD exclusively used the Near-road NO2 Monitoring Technical Assistance Document (TAD) provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to systematically find a suitable placement for this monitoring site. The TAD methodically outlines a very detailed approach to find a location for the Near-road NO2 site. Selection criteria includes annual average daily traffic, heavy duty traffic, traffic congestion, road design, terrain, meteorology, population exposure, safety, and access.

- Louisville Metro Air Pollution Control District