LouisvilleWater.com Newsroom


Louisville Water Partners with Harrod's Creek Fire District to Transport Employees to Zorn Avenue Pumping Station

Monday April 25, 2011

Flooding does not impact Louisville Water’s treatment process in providing 127 million gallons of drinking water each day, but it does create a challenge in reaching the Zorn Avenue Pumping Station.
 

Flood waters have made it impossible for Louisville Water crews to get to the Zorn Avenue facility by traditional means. Monday afternoon, Harrod’s Creek Fire District solved the problem with its Zodiac motor boat.

Firefighters transported two employees across River Road to staff the pump station on a 24-hour basis. This plan will continue at least through Wednesday.

Operations at the pumping station are automated but it is still necessary to monitor the pumps on a daily basis, especially during flood conditions.

Pumping Stations Numbers 2 and 3 were constructed in 1893 and 1920, respectively, and can operate during flood conditions. In fact, Louisville Water has dealt with numerous high-water situations in its 150 year history.
 
In the late 1800s, the Ohio River frequently rushed over its banks. During the 1937 flood, the company devised a plan using a tow boat loaded with coal to put one steam engine in operation. During the 1997 flood, Louisville Water used a helicopter to gain access to the facilities.