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Mayor Greg Fischer Newsroom


Mayor helps Open Parkland Scholar House

Wednesday August 7, 2013

Today, Family Scholar House held the grand opening for its new Parkland Scholar House campus, located at 1309 Catalpa Street in the heart of the Parkland neighborhood in western Louisville. The campus, which includes the historic Parkland School built in 1891, will house 48 families in the Family Scholar House residential program and provide programs to benefit the neighborhood.

The project includes the renovation of the historic school as well as new construction to provide apartment homes for single-parent families, a computer lab, program and meeting space, Family Café and Children’s Nutrition Lab, Dare to Care food pantry, reading areas, a playground, green space and parking. The school’s bell tower has also been re-created, signifying the organization’s focus on education. The official groundbreaking for the renovation and construction project took place less than a year ago, in September 2012.

With the support of Family Scholar House’s comprehensive services, residents are empowered to earn a college degree, so they are able to support their family and increase career opportunities and options upon graduation. Other Family Scholar House campuses include its Louisville Family Scholar House campus (near the University of Louisville), Downtown Family Scholar House campus and Stoddard Johnston Scholar House campus.

"Family Scholar House is committed to bringing the academic programs and support services that encourage and empower educational attainment in our community," said Cathe Dykstra, Family Scholar House’s Chief Possibility Officer. "We have been warmly welcomed into the Parkland neighborhood and look forward to serving not only our residential student parents and their children but also others in the community as they pursue college degrees and career opportunities."

The new campus will serve the 48 single-parent students and their children living at Parkland Scholar House, as well as its Parkland neighbors. The community will benefit from the community kitchen, dining room and food pantry, and residents will be able to apply for housing, receive educational services, participate in workforce development and computer training, and receive assistance through resume workshops and employment fairs.

"This latest Family Scholar House will be an important addition to the Parkland area and will provide support, inspiration and a brighter future to many individuals and families in the years ahead," Mayor Greg Fischer said. "Family Scholar House represents Louisville striving to be first in life-long learning, first in health and first in compassion." 

“Parkland Scholar House has already served as a wonderful community partner in the Parkland neighborhood from helping to build the Community Garden to active engagement with the Corridor Improvement Project,” said Councilwoman Attica Scott (D-1). “I am honored to serve as the Metro Council representative to all of the new families who will call the Parkland Scholar House home, and residents are anxious to welcome forty-eight new families to the neighborhood.”

The $11 million renovation and construction project was made possible thanks to low-income housing tax credits awarded through Kentucky Housing Corporation with PNC Real Estate serving as the equity provider, support from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Louisville Metro Government and Louisville Metro Housing Authority, and a generous grant from the James Graham Brown Foundation. A grant from the UPS Foundation provided funds to install security equipment and systems. Fifth Third Bank provided computer equipment for each resident through its Lab-A-Quarter Program and is donating computers for the computer lab and for facility administrative staff as well.



About Family Scholar House

Family Scholar House is changing lives, families and communities through education.

Our mission is to end the cycle of poverty by giving single-parent students the support they need to earn a four-year college degree.