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Citizens Can Now Recycle Used Cooking Oil

Monday September 24, 2012

Louisville Metro’s Department of Solid Waste Management is now offering four collection sites to recycle cooking oil, providing yet another way for citizens to make Louisville a more sustainable city.

It is an easy, green step to take in your home. First, strain the oil to remove any large food particles then save the oil in a container free of any contaminants. When it is ready to be dropped off, a recycling attendant will assist in pouring the oil into one of the 400 gallon containers placed at each drop-off site.

“By responsibly recycling their cooking oil, residents are helping keep our community’s sewer system clean, and the resultant biodiesel fuel will help reduce the use of petroleum products,” said Maria Koetter, director of Louisville Metro’s Office of Sustainability. “This initiative is a win-win for our environment.”

Any vegetable cooking oil will be accepted that is liquid at room temperature, including olive, soybean and canola oils.

The service is residential only. Businesses may not drop-off used cooking oil.

Cooking oil recycling is now available at these staffed recycling locations:

(Hours of operation: Tuesday – Saturday from 10am-5pm)

First District Public Works Yard

595 N. Hubbards Lane (on the corner of Brownsboro Rd.)

Metro Parks Landscaping
9300 Whipps Mill Road

Southwest Government Center
7219 Dixie Highway

Central Government Center
7201 Outer Loop

The oil collection containers will be pick-up regularly by Terra Renewal, a company that won the oil recycling contract through Metro Government’s bidding process. The contract with the company guarantees 100% of the recycled oil collected will go towards the production of biodiesel fuel.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Solid Waste estimates that one to three billion gallons of waste oil are produced each year in the U.S. which could be processed into biodiesel.

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