Economic Development Newsroom 


Resident Magazine Ranks Louisville Among 11 Great Cities

Wednesday October 3, 2007

Resident, a weekly lifestyle magazine published in New York City, has named Louisville one of “11 Great Places to Live.”

The cover story for the week of Oct. 1 cited Louisville’s low housing prices, vibrant and growing downtown and independent arts scene.

It also touts Old Louisville, with its “brick Victorian houses that can be had for a song,” along with Louisville’s diverse restaurant scene, including Avalon and Le Relais.

“We in Louisville know we have a great city and a great lifestyle,” Mayor Jerry Abramson said. “Now, all of New York City knows it.”

Other cities named to the Great Places list include Santa Fe, Atlanta, Boston, Phoenix and Palm Beach.

“At the crossroads of the Midwest and the South, Louisville has a bit of an identity crisis,” the magazine said. “New arrivals expecting a backwater town may be pleasantly surprised by the lively arts scene...”

“The once sparsely populated riverside area next to the central business district has experienced a surge in new construction and redevelopment in the last few years — spurred on, perhaps, by the influx of professionals from other cities who brought their notions of loft living to Louisville,” the story continued. “The recently completed park fronting the Ohio River is another enticement.”

The story said Louisville — along with the other 10 cities — are great places to own a second home.

For more information, see www.resident.com

((text of the article))
LOUISVILLE

At the crossroads of the Midwest and the South, Louisville has a bit of an identity crisis. New arrivals expecting a backwater town may be pleasantly surprised by the lively arts scene, but the downside is that you’ll be stranded in the middle of Kentucky. A 15-minute drive from the city center brings you to places that are decidedly countrified, so if you lack a taste for horse country and bluegrass music, you might want to move elsewhere. — Cotton Delo

LIVE
The once sparsely populated river-side area next to the central business district has experienced a surge in new construction and redevelopment in the last few years – spurred on, perhaps, by the influx of professionals from other cities who brought their notions of loft living to Louisville. The recently completed park fronting the Ohio River is another enticement. Elsewhere in town, Old Louisville is lined with brick Victorian houses that can be had for a song compared to what you’d pay in New York. High-end rentals aren’t much en vogue, since one of the city’s main inducements is cheap real estate.

WORK
The health care industry is said to employ 45,000 people in the city – mostly in the downtown area – and Fortune 500 companies Humana and Kindred Healthcare are headquartered there. Louisvillians also take pride in the presence of Brown-Forman, the distiller of Woodford Reserve and Jack Daniels, among other labels, and one-third of all bourbon whiskey is made in Louisville. Ford and General Electric also have major operations there.

PLAY
Louisville has surprisingly diverse dining options – including Vietnamese, Thai and Jamaican – in addition to dependably good comfort food, but if you want a serious meal, head to Le Relais, which serves up French cuisine in 1940s art deco environs. Though the refreshingly unpretentious vibe of the city is arguably at its best in neighborhood bars, you can find interesting cocktails and wine lists at restaurants like Avalon. Lovers of thoroughbred racing and mint juleps will appreciate Churchill Downs, though it might be wise to avoid the track during the Kentucky Derby, when drunkards from across the nation converge. The city also has a serious college basketball fixation, working itself into a frenzy over the University of Louisville’s (U of L’s) rivalry with the University of Kentucky. The city has its own Central Park in Old Louisville, designed by none other than Frederick Law Olmstead. The Actors Theatre of Louisville, a renowned regional company, is also in town.

FAMILY
Many Louisvillians of means send their kids to Louisville Country Day School, where tuition is $14,780 for grades 6-12.
A competitor is Louisville Collegiate School, where annual fees are $16,500 at the middle and upper schools.