Hack-a-Thon a Success

Metro Government, in partnership with Code for America, held a Hack-a-thon on Saturday, February 23rd, offering $10,000 in cash prizes for apps or computer coding ideas for the city.

“The task is to design or prototype an app that helps improve the quality of life in our city,” Mayor Greg Fischer said. “No idea is too strange or too bold. We want to see interesting ideas and innovation at work.”

18 teams offered up some great ideas, from geolocating features in our parks, to a program to manage our power grid by tracking smart phone power usage. The ideas were judged by a 4 person panel and ultimately yielded 3 winners of $5000, $3000 and $2000 for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. The winning ideas and code will be used by the city to bring the ideas to life. The three winning ideas are:



First Place: Your Mapper Team
First place went to a smartphone app called Safety Check, which uses the city's crime data to display crime and a safety rating/number for the area around you. The app allows you to get details about the crime and notify the closest police division to report crime or crime tips. The app also allows you to set alerts to be notified when you are in a high crime area.

Team Members: Michael Schnuerle and Eric Roland



Second Place - Forest Giants Team
2nd place featured an app that showcases bike routes, allowing you to record your ride, map it and share it with others. The app uses GPS to find the closest bike loops, view details for each loop, record ride stats, share your ride, and even allows you to take a picture and report loop hazards. The app could eventually help the city's bike program determine what areas of town are most popular for rides which might determine where more infrastructure is needed for bike lanes and paths.

Team Members: Dave Durand, Chris Hawkins, Adam Richardson, Ryan Stemen and Ashleigh Chape



Third Place - Clean Up Team
Third place went to the Clean Up Team, featuring an app to use crowd sourcing and social media to help clean up the city. The app lets you take a picture of an area of concern and share it with others, gather volunteers via Facebook events, track attendees, and more. The app empowers citizens to get involved and help their city, especially during these tight budget times for Metro Government.

Team Members: Troy Harvey, Ashley Revlett, Charles Waddell and Steven Trentham